Anti fungal vrs horticulture

Anti fungal vrs horticulture


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Anti fungal vrs horticulture

Tropical Fruit and Vegetable Crops Research Australia is pleased to present this special issue on "antifungal crops" in relation to horticulture. A total of 8 articles were submitted by researchers with a wide range of experience and research interests. The journal editor considered the submitted articles to be of special interest to the Australian horticulture industry. The submissions reflect exciting and cutting edge research that can contribute to our understanding of the potential use of antifungal plant metabolites in horticulture. In this special issue there are 6 reviews, 2 opinion articles and 1 research article. A review on alternative control methods in citrus production and control of fire blight and peach velvet rot was published by [@B5]. Two reviews on the control of Verticillium wilt of potato and tomato and on fungal pathogens of vegetables and tropical crops were published by [@B11] and [@B10] respectively. A review on alternative control methods in citrus production and control of fire blight and peach velvet rot was published by [@B5]. Two reviews on the control of Verticillium wilt of potato and tomato and on fungal pathogens of vegetables and tropical crops were published by [@B11] and [@B10] respectively.

A very well written review by [@B6] covers research on biocontrol of fungi by antagonistic micro-organisms, including those which produce antifungal compounds. They also discuss other fungal antagonists such as beneficial microflora and the use of genetic engineering. The review is very detailed and covers information on more than 50 organisms and the results of many experiments in the published literature.

An excellent review by [@B3] addresses the antifungal effects of plant derived antimicrobial compounds and their impact on agriculture, horticulture and clinical medicine. They identify antifungal proteins (such as lectins) and phytoantimicrobial metabolites as a rich source of antimicrobial compounds. Other than natural compounds, they also review chemically synthesized antibiotics and anti-microbial peptides. There are many articles discussing potential control of fungal pathogens by plant derived antimicrobial compounds. The main emphasis of this review is on phytoantimicrobial metabolites.

Research in plant-pathogen interactions continues to expand. [@B1] discuss the molecular and genetic control of plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens. The review by [@B9] discusses the molecular mechanism of plant resistance against necrotrophic pathogens. The review by [@B2] is specifically on the role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the defense mechanism in Arabidopsis against Botrytis cinerea. Reviews on the impact of plant biotechnology on the control of diseases in vegetable and fruit crops, including those that are not considered to be pathogenic, have been published recently ([@B7], [@B13]). A detailed review on the management of diseases in plant crops through the application of genetic engineering is published by [@B8].

We hope that the articles in the Plant Pathology Special Issue will be helpful to investigators in this important area of research.

[^1]: This article was submitted to Plant-Microbe Interaction, a section of the journal Frontiers in Plant Science.

[^2]: †These authors have contributed equally to this work.